Developing Color Print Film in Kodak D76?

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Greg Winterflood
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Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 2:11 pm

Developing Color Print Film in Kodak D76?

Post by Greg Winterflood » Sun Apr 08, 2007 8:04 pm

I have seen an example of this on flickr. The photographer used Rodinal to develop cheapo color film, and it came out with a reddish brown sepia effect when scanned. I found a supply of Konica VX100 which is in date and cost $2 per roll of 24. I'm wondering if anyone has a recipe for developing this type of film in Kodak D76, which is the only developer I have been able to obtain in town. I've seen discussion of doing this on other photo sites but have not seen a definitive "recipe".


Ornello
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Re: Developing Color Print Film in Kodak D76?

Post by Ornello » Mon Apr 09, 2007 8:10 am

Greg Winterflood wrote:I have seen an example of this on flickr. The photographer used Rodinal to develop cheapo color film, and it came out with a reddish brown sepia effect when scanned. I found a supply of Konica VX100 which is in date and cost $2 per roll of 24. I'm wondering if anyone has a recipe for developing this type of film in Kodak D76, which is the only developer I have been able to obtain in town. I've seen discussion of doing this on other photo sites but have not seen a definitive "recipe".
Sigh.....another one....

Greg Winterflood
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 2:11 pm

Re: Developing Color Print Film in Kodak D76?

Post by Greg Winterflood » Tue Apr 10, 2007 4:32 am

Ornello wrote: Sigh.....another one....
That is exactly the response I expected from that ordinary fellow - Ornello.

At least I'm learning from other sources and am having fun doing it. I tell a little tale in the link below about playing with cheap colour film in B&W chemistry.

http://tjilpi.typepad.com/tjilpi/2007/0 ... ep_fo.html

Yesterday I made another advance, on the story told in the link above. In my enlarger I put a yellow filter above the developed negative colur film and came up with a much more respectable B&W negative image. I then reversed the digital image of that in Windows Paint and came out with a respectable black and white image.

At least messing around with $2 rolls of near expired 24 shot colour film is giving me experience. It is cheaper than destroying precious rolls of 8 shot efke127 R100 at $6.46AUD.

Tomorrow I'm off to the only outlet in this isolated town to get some photographic paper and appropriate developer - if they have any in stock.

I'll also drop into a different store to see what kind of deal I can get on good quality flatbed film scanner.

Sigh......if only I knew everything, I wouldn't need to experiment or ask questions.

Ornello
Posts: 875
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Re: Developing Color Print Film in Kodak D76?

Post by Ornello » Tue Apr 10, 2007 7:59 am

Greg Winterflood wrote:
Ornello wrote: Sigh.....another one....
That is exactly the response I expected from that ordinary fellow - Ornello.

At least I'm learning from other sources and am having fun doing it. I tell a little tale in the link below about playing with cheap colour film in B&W chemistry.

http://tjilpi.typepad.com/tjilpi/2007/0 ... ep_fo.html

Yesterday I made another advance, on the story told in the link above. In my enlarger I put a yellow filter above the developed negative colur film and came up with a much more respectable B&W negative image. I then reversed the digital image of that in Windows Paint and came out with a respectable black and white image.

At least messing around with $2 rolls of near expired 24 shot colour film is giving me experience. It is cheaper than destroying precious rolls of 8 shot efke127 R100 at $6.46AUD.

Tomorrow I'm off to the only outlet in this isolated town to get some photographic paper and appropriate developer - if they have any in stock.

I'll also drop into a different store to see what kind of deal I can get on good quality flatbed film scanner.

Sigh......if only I knew everything, I wouldn't need to experiment or ask questions.
Color films (except Kodachrome) contain dye-formers which cannot be removed. This will give you a very dense negative. Doing this sort of 'experiment' is not something that would entertain me. Life is too short.
Last edited by Ornello on Tue Apr 10, 2007 2:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Keith Tapscott.
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Location: Plymouth, England.

Post by Keith Tapscott. » Tue Apr 10, 2007 1:12 pm

I have read about some photographers using the C-41 colour negative film developer to process the now discontinued Kodak Technical Pan film, of which the results were said to be very satisfactory. Of course, the films needed to be fixed in regular B&W fixer, as a blix (bleach-fix) solution would remove entirely any silver image on the film base.
Some photographers run colour negative films in E-6 chemistry and colour reversal films in C-41 chemistry (cross-processing), although not something that has ever appealed to me.
I suppose that some like trying somethings that are considered abnormal practice. :roll:

Greg Winterflood
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Post by Greg Winterflood » Tue Apr 10, 2007 6:14 pm

I picked up the idea from a young lady in Brisbane, Queensland.

If you look at one of her results here

http://www.flickr.com/photos/asterope/4 ... otostream/

you'll see that, even if processing old colour film in b&w chemistry is considered abnormal, it can produce charming results.

I thought I should try it myself; but have not yet been able to produce equivalent results.:lol:

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 531
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Post by Keith Tapscott. » Wed Apr 11, 2007 5:48 am

Greg Winterflood wrote:I picked up the idea from a young lady in Brisbane, Queensland.

If you look at one of her results here

http://www.flickr.com/photos/asterope/4 ... otostream/

you'll see that, even if processing old colour film in b&w chemistry is considered abnormal, it can produce charming results.

I thought I should try it myself; but have not yet been able to produce equivalent results.:lol:
The dark tones seem to be very devoid of detail and I`m not keen on the over all tonality or colour, although looking at an image on a PC monitor can be very different than seeing a print in the`flesh` so to speak. This doesn`t appeal to me at all, although I`m sure that the author of the image likes it and it is clearly a case of "Each to their own preferences". :o

Ornello
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Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Post by Ornello » Wed Apr 11, 2007 3:56 pm

Greg Winterflood wrote:I picked up the idea from a young lady in Brisbane, Queensland.

If you look at one of her results here

http://www.flickr.com/photos/asterope/4 ... otostream/

you'll see that, even if processing old colour film in b&w chemistry is considered abnormal, it can produce charming results.

I thought I should try it myself; but have not yet been able to produce equivalent results.:lol:
Nothing to see here folks, move right along....

Greg Winterflood
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 2:11 pm

Post by Greg Winterflood » Wed Apr 11, 2007 5:52 pm

Ornello wrote: Nothing to see here folks, move right along....
He's right folks, do what the Thought Policeman tells you. :roll:

pentaxpete
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Location: BRENTWOOD,Essex,(UK)

Post by pentaxpete » Mon Apr 16, 2007 11:54 am

"There was a Young Lady from Brisbane..............................................."

(Site members can write their end to the Limerick I'm sure !)
Got COMPUTERISED and 'slightly Digitised Pentax K10D' but FILM STILL RULES !

Ornello
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Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Post by Ornello » Mon Apr 16, 2007 12:03 pm

pentaxpete wrote:"There was a Young Lady from Brisbane..............................................."

(Site members can write their end to the Limerick I'm sure !)
There was a young lady from Brisbane
Whose 'plaint was that her horses were lame.
Her cannon was dusty and her hinges were rusty
And no-one could remember her name!

Greg Winterflood
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 2:11 pm

Doesn't Rhyme

Post by Greg Winterflood » Mon Apr 16, 2007 4:12 pm

Ornello wrote:There was a young lady from Brisbane
Whose 'plaint was that her horses were lame.
:shock: Brisbane is pronounced 'Briz bin', not 'Briz bane'

No poetic licence granted here folks, move right along.

Ornello
Posts: 875
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Re: Doesn't Rhyme

Post by Ornello » Tue Apr 17, 2007 8:22 am

Greg Winterflood wrote:
Ornello wrote:There was a young lady from Brisbane
Whose 'plaint was that her horses were lame.
:shock: Brisbane is pronounced 'Briz bin', not 'Briz bane'

No poetic licence granted here folks, move right along.
There once was a lassie from Leeds
Who had barnacles and twice-pickled knees
She saw a fine Norse
With hemet and horse
Badly afflicted with flees...

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 531
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Re: Doesn't Rhyme

Post by Keith Tapscott. » Tue Apr 17, 2007 9:37 am

Ornello wrote:
Greg Winterflood wrote:
Ornello wrote:There was a young lady from Brisbane
Whose 'plaint was that her horses were lame.
:shock: Brisbane is pronounced 'Briz bin', not 'Briz bane'

No poetic licence granted here folks, move right along.
There once was a lassie from Leeds
Who had barnacles and twice-pickled knees
She saw a fine Norse
With hemet and horse
Badly afflicted with flees...
That`s no good, it doesn`t rhyme with "Briz bin".

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